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Xyleme LCMS XML Localization

Omni Intercommunications - Thursday, April 25, 2019

Since 2013, Omni has spent a considerable amount of time developing processes for the seamless and effective localization of Xyleme’s XML-based content.

The challenge inherent to XML localization is for the coding to be protected, allowing translated files to be successfully integrated into the Xyleme LCMS with little or no intervention from the developer. Indeed, disturb the code and everything comes to a standstill. Since XML is dynamic by nature in its ability to be customized, the developer and/or the LCMS can use specific terminology to produce the frontend content. In order to accommodate this variability, Omni must continually develop unique processes and parsing rules that expose the content to be translated while hiding the code from the translators.

Since other hurdles can be present in the XML files, a close working relationship between Omni and the developer is required to develop solutions. No one knows the material and the backend content more than the team who created it and consequently, they can play a big part by providing a few things that can ensure the success of the project.

Since the backend content must remain undisturbed, it is essential that the developer provide a customized "DO NOT TRANSLATE" list of elements that must remain untouched. Using this list, the parsing rules specific to each client are adjusted to protect the code critical to the function, while exposing the content to be localized to the translators. This list is typically updated regularly to reflect the changes made by the developer.

Additionally, reference material goes a long way to providing clarity during the translation process. Seeing a PDF or viewing the course online allows the translators to see the words in context, giving them a better understanding of the meaning. Hyperlinks for items like glossary terms or other cross references can cause issues when translation strings are broken. For example, a course with a glossary of terms may provide the following text for translation:

"This glossary contains many words."  

A simple sentence… but to the translator, it might look like this:    

This <glossary_word:"Glossary"><glossary_definition:"A list of terms and their definition">glossary</glossary_definition></glossary_word> contains many words.

Seeing the sentence in context may be the only way to logically navigate such content.

Years of experience in localizing Xyleme files allow Omni to lessen time to deployment and lower localization costs. Omni delivers fully functional, multilingual XML — all accurately translated, on time, and within budget.

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